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Unbroken | Music for Deckchairs

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 22:39
"Fault is the shadow thrown by the magic bean we sell as the means of clambering up to a future in which not everyone can win. This bean is something to do with making an effort, toughing it out, following the rules. Resilience, grit—we peddle all sorts of qualities demanded when the world is harsh. And I think this is why we monitor attendance as a kind of minor virtue, a practice of grit. But when we make showing up compulsory, then we have to have a system of checking it, and penalties, and some means of managing something we call “genuine” adversity, and the whole thing has to be insulated against complaint. (And if you want to know more about how this goes down, this forum is an eye-opener.) Where I am we have a fixed tolerance for not showing up 20% of the time, which has the rat farming perverse incentive effect of causing every sensible student to calculate that they have two free tutorials they can plan to miss. And I’ve written this all over the place, so just bear with me while I haul out my soapbox one more time: we then ask students to get a GP certificate for every single additional missed class over the two free passes, which means that we are clogging up the waiting rooms and schedules of our overworked public health bulk billed GP clinics in order to sustain a rigid and penalty-driven policy that doesn’t prepare students for their professional futures, while they’re sneezing all over the really sick people around them. (University business data divisions currently measuring every passing cloud over the campus, why not measure this? How many GP certificates for trivial illness have your attendance policies generated? How much public health time have you wasted pursuing this?) Just quietly, I take a different approach. We talk about modelling attendance on the professional experience of attending meetings, including client meetings. If you can’t be there, you let people know in advance. If you can’t be there a lot, this will impact on your client’s confidence in you, or your manager’s sense that you are doing a good job. It may come up in performance management. Your co-workers may start to feel that you’re not showing up for them. Opportunities may dry up a bit, if people think of you as someone who won’t make a reliable contribution. And at work there won’t always be a form, but you will need a form of words. You need to know how to talk about what you’re facing with the relevant people comfortably and in a timely way, ideally not after the fact of the missed project deliverable. If hidden challenges are affecting your participation now, you can expect some of these to show up again when you’re working. University should be the safe space to develop confidence in talking about the situation you’re in, and what helps you manage it most effectively. You need a robust understanding of your rights in law. And, sadly, you also need to understand that sometimes the human response you get will be uninformed, ungenerous or unaware of your rights, and you’ll need either to stand your ground or call for back up. To me, this is all that’s useful about expecting attendance. It’s an opportunity for us to talk with students about showing up as a choice that may be negotiable if you know how to ask; about presence and absence as ethical practices; and about the hardest conversations about times when you just can’t, and at that point need to accept the kindness that’s shown to you, just as you would show it to others." … "To sustain compassionate workplaces, we’re going to need to do more than dashboard our moods in these simplistic ways and hurry on. We’re going to need to “sit with the rough edges of our journey”, as Kevin Gannon puts it, to understand how we each got here differently, in different states of mind, and to hold each other up with care. This will take time."

Unbroken | Music for Deckchairs

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 22:39
"Fault is the shadow thrown by the magic bean we sell as the means of clambering up to a future in which not everyone can win. This bean is something to do with making an effort, toughing it out, following the rules. Resilience, grit—we peddle all sorts of qualities demanded when the world is harsh. And I think this is why we monitor attendance as a kind of minor virtue, a practice of grit. But when we make showing up compulsory, then we have to have a system of checking it, and penalties, and some means of managing something we call “genuine” adversity, and the whole thing has to be insulated against complaint. (And if you want to know more about how this goes down, this forum is an eye-opener.) Where I am we have a fixed tolerance for not showing up 20% of the time, which has the rat farming perverse incentive effect of causing every sensible student to calculate that they have two free tutorials they can plan to miss. And I’ve written this all over the place, so just bear with me while I haul out my soapbox one more time: we then ask students to get a GP certificate for every single additional missed class over the two free passes, which means that we are clogging up the waiting rooms and schedules of our overworked public health bulk billed GP clinics in order to sustain a rigid and penalty-driven policy that doesn’t prepare students for their professional futures, while they’re sneezing all over the really sick people around them. (University business data divisions currently measuring every passing cloud over the campus, why not measure this? How many GP certificates for trivial illness have your attendance policies generated? How much public health time have you wasted pursuing this?) Just quietly, I take a different approach. We talk about modelling attendance on the professional experience of attending meetings, including client meetings. If you can’t be there, you let people know in advance. If you can’t be there a lot, this will impact on your client’s confidence in you, or your manager’s sense that you are doing a good job. It may come up in performance management. Your co-workers may start to feel that you’re not showing up for them. Opportunities may dry up a bit, if people think of you as someone who won’t make a reliable contribution. And at work there won’t always be a form, but you will need a form of words. You need to know how to talk about what you’re facing with the relevant people comfortably and in a timely way, ideally not after the fact of the missed project deliverable. If hidden challenges are affecting your participation now, you can expect some of these to show up again when you’re working. University should be the safe space to develop confidence in talking about the situation you’re in, and what helps you manage it most effectively. You need a robust understanding of your rights in law. And, sadly, you also need to understand that sometimes the human response you get will be uninformed, ungenerous or unaware of your rights, and you’ll need either to stand your ground or call for back up. To me, this is all that’s useful about expecting attendance. It’s an opportunity for us to talk with students about showing up as a choice that may be negotiable if you know how to ask; about presence and absence as ethical practices; and about the hardest conversations about times when you just can’t, and at that point need to accept the kindness that’s shown to you, just as you would show it to others." … "To sustain compassionate workplaces, we’re going to need to do more than dashboard our moods in these simplistic ways and hurry on. We’re going to need to “sit with the rough edges of our journey”, as Kevin Gannon puts it, to understand how we each got here differently, in different states of mind, and to hold each other up with care. This will take time."

Baseball Comes from Behind to Win Third-Straight Game

Sat, 05/13/2017 - 08:07

Mustangs Defeat County College of Morris, 11-9

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- A five-run seventh inning turned an 8-6 disadvantage into the Monroe College Baseball team's third-straight win, an 11-9 victory over the County College of Morris on Monday. Wayne Roberts led the Mustangs with three hits.

New Rochelle Sports - College

Second Inning Offense Pushes #20 St. John's Past Iona Baseball, 16-4

Sat, 05/13/2017 - 08:04

Second Inning Offense Pushes #20 St. John's Past Iona Baseball, 16-4

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- An 11-run second inning allowed 20th ranked St. John's to upend the Iona College baseball program 16-4 earlier this evening in non-conference action at Jack Kaiser Stadium.

In the bottom of the second inning, the Red Storm (32-7) collected 11 hits to help tally 11 runs. The inning started with back-to-back single before the first run, Josh Shaw, scored on a sacrifice fly from Robbie Knightes. Five more singles resulted in the scored increasing to 5-0 for the hosts before Gui Gingras doubled to score two more runs.

New Rochelle Sports - College

Bravo US'20, 4x800 Relay Set Records at Annual New York Relays

Sat, 05/13/2017 - 07:55

Bravo US'20, 4x800 Relay Set Records at Annual New York Relays

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- Freshman Pedro Bravo US'20 and the 4-by-800-meter relay team set records this past weekend at the 13th Annual New York Relays. Bravo broke the previous CHSAA league freshman 3,200-meter record by four seconds, while the relay team ran the fastest 4-by-800 in more than two years.

Bravo ran an incredible time of 9:42.45, good for the fifth-best 3,200 time in Iona Preparatory history and the fastest freshman in New York. And that was just Day 1.

New Rochelle Sports - College

Monroe Drops a Pair to Harford CC

Fri, 05/12/2017 - 06:56

Monroe Drops a Pair to Harford CC

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- The Monroe College Baseball team dropped a pair of games at Harford Community College on Thursday, losing the opener, 10-4 and falling in the second game, 4-2. Marcus Espinal extended his hitting streak to seven games.

The Mustangs fell behind early in game one against the Fighting Owls, giving up a pair of runs in the first. Monroe got one back in the second on consecutive singles from Espinal, Andy Karlan, and Adonis Garcia. Garcia and Espinal combined for seven hits in Monroe's previous game, and they were just getting started against Harford.

New Rochelle Sports - College

Monroe Baseball Gets 12 Hits and 3 Homers in Loss at Sullivan

Fri, 05/12/2017 - 06:44

Monroe Baseball Gets 12 Hits and 3 Homers in Loss at Sullivan

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- The Monroe College Baseball team's bats certainly did the job in a 14-7 loss at Sullivan County Community College on Wednesday. The team slugged 12 hits and three homers, but saw their three-game winning streak come to a close in the setback.

The Mustangs took a 2-0 lead in the first inning on RBI singles from Troy Davern, who went 2-4 in the game, and Marcus Espinal, who posted career-highs in hits (four) and RBIs (three). The Generals scored three times in the bottom of the inning and led, 3-2.

New Rochelle Sports - College

Softball Splits Senior Day; Earns at least a Share of the MAAC Regular Season Crown

Fri, 05/12/2017 - 06:30

Softball Splits Senior Day; Earns at least a Share of the MAAC Regular Season Crown

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- The Iona College softball program capped off senior day winning game two 1-0, earning itself at least a share of the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Regular Season Championship.  Prior to the doubleheader beginning against Manhattan, Head Coach Melissa Inouye and her staff honored student manager Lauren Filardi, Kelsey Long, Ashlyn Morris, Katie Newton and Kristen Turner for their four years of service to the Maroon & Gold program.

Game One: Manhattan 7, Iona 1

New Rochelle Sports - College

Baseball Drops Series Finale to Canisius, 2-0, Following Senior Day

Fri, 05/12/2017 - 06:14

Baseball Drops Series Finale to Canisius, 2-0, Following Senior Day

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- A seven-inning performance from Zachary Sloan helped Canisius College come away with a three-game sweep of Iona College this weekend by claiming today's finale 2-0.

Sloan allowed just two hits and struck out five in seven scoreless innings for the Griffs (29-18, 12-6 MAAC) before handing the ball off to the bullpen that included Tyler Smith recording his 10th save of the season.

New Rochelle Sports - College

Four Gold Medals Highlight Day One For Iona At MAAC Outdoor Track & Field Championships

Fri, 05/12/2017 - 06:03

Four Gold Medals Highlight Day One For Iona At MAAC Outdoor Track & Field Championships

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- Four gold medals that includes two each from the Iona College men's and women's track & field teams in two events highlighted the first day of competition at the MAAC Outdoor Championships at Rider University.

New Rochelle Sports - College

Softball Splits a Pair at Siena

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 15:37

Softball Splits a Pair at Siena

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 15:37

Monroe Baseball Defeats Nassau CC, 11-1

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 15:37

Monroe Baseball Defeats Nassau CC, 11-1

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 15:37

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