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(500) https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2018/11/16/camp-fire-smoke-closes-uc-berkeley-other-bay-area-colleges/?tid=ss_tw&utm_term=.12747349a670

Sports River of News - Sun, 11/18/2018 - 18:31
RT @Supernetworks: Camp #Fire smoke closes #UC-Berkeley and other Bay Area #colleges #hazardous #air #quality

The Real Enemy of Education Reform: It’s the Colleges, Stupid | The New Republic

Sports River of News - Sun, 11/18/2018 - 01:33
"Colleges do very well under the status quo. And that’s bad for students and our economy." … "Where is all this money going? Many point to the rise of university administrator salaries and staffs. (You might know them as the college presidents complaining about all these changes Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama want to make to the higher education system.) Another possible culprit is bloated construction costs, which go toward building show palaces for…well, for the administrators to crow about, and attract more students to pay those high tuition rates. Whatever explanation appeals to you, the failures of the current system point clearly toward supplying a public debt-free option as a way to drive down costs. This would provide an anchor against skyrocketing costs, and force the cleanup of administrative bloat and unnecessary construction spending. You can force public colleges to lower costs as a condition of accepting tuition reimbursement. And if a glut of student loans causes prices to rise, then a free public option would reverse the effect. This goes back to the core issue: Incumbents prospering from a system don’t have much interest in seeing it change. And those wanting to reform the system must challenge those incumbents. It’s easier to single out the easy villains, the Sallie Maes and the Corinthian Colleges. But that just sidesteps the real opponent, and will lead to something far less than reform. Most colleges are seen in a fairly benevolent light. Large higher-education institutions are often major employers in their communities. They drive innovation, and provide sanctuary to some of our best thinkers. And for many adults, they are wrapped in the warm and fuzzy gauze of nostalgia. It’s hard to get people to see them as propping up a crisis that is over-burdening students and even stunting the growth of our economy. But until we do, it’s going to be very difficult to see any change."

The Real Enemy of Education Reform: It’s the Colleges, Stupid | The New Republic

College Sports River of News - Sun, 11/18/2018 - 01:33
"Colleges do very well under the status quo. And that’s bad for students and our economy." … "Where is all this money going? Many point to the rise of university administrator salaries and staffs. (You might know them as the college presidents complaining about all these changes Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama want to make to the higher education system.) Another possible culprit is bloated construction costs, which go toward building show palaces for…well, for the administrators to crow about, and attract more students to pay those high tuition rates. Whatever explanation appeals to you, the failures of the current system point clearly toward supplying a public debt-free option as a way to drive down costs. This would provide an anchor against skyrocketing costs, and force the cleanup of administrative bloat and unnecessary construction spending. You can force public colleges to lower costs as a condition of accepting tuition reimbursement. And if a glut of student loans causes prices to rise, then a free public option would reverse the effect. This goes back to the core issue: Incumbents prospering from a system don’t have much interest in seeing it change. And those wanting to reform the system must challenge those incumbents. It’s easier to single out the easy villains, the Sallie Maes and the Corinthian Colleges. But that just sidesteps the real opponent, and will lead to something far less than reform. Most colleges are seen in a fairly benevolent light. Large higher-education institutions are often major employers in their communities. They drive innovation, and provide sanctuary to some of our best thinkers. And for many adults, they are wrapped in the warm and fuzzy gauze of nostalgia. It’s hard to get people to see them as propping up a crisis that is over-burdening students and even stunting the growth of our economy. But until we do, it’s going to be very difficult to see any change."

We can’t educate our kids out of inequality | The Outline

Sports River of News - Sun, 11/18/2018 - 01:32
"Those who tout the advantages of a good education like to conjure an image of some future society full of educated professionals all working stable, fulfilling, and salaried jobs. But even the worst students can look around the world and see through this. They can see the economic instability facing most people, and they know that a good education won’t undo the vagaries of the gig economy, or replace the protections of a union. But, they’re told, if you do well enough in school, then hopefully you won’t have to worry about that stuff. This false promise was more disheartening that any other realization I had while working with students. Unfair tests, confusing admissions policies, unequal schools — all that is bad but sadly unsurprising, so you can prepare yourself for it. On the other hand, I was not prepared to lie to students about how, if they just figured out trig functions, then everything would be OK. Education fetishism gives the illusion of fairness to society’s inequalities. Grades and test scores and college rankings mirror the stratification of the economy, and apply a thin veneer of meritocracy to that hierarchy. What students internalize about school is that it is primarily about ranking people. So attempts to improve education are really attempts to make those rankings more accurate, instead of making them less determinative. As long as this is true, then education is not really the solution to society’s problems. Even bold steps to improve schools and bring down college costs will not fix the problem of inequality, since status and sorting are also the results of education in America. None of this is to say that education is bad or that schools should not be improved for their own sake. Learning things, after all, is fun. Education is great when it’s about teaching people stuff they want to know. But because school has to serve this burden of fixing social problems it is not equipped to fix, it cannot simply teach students interesting things they want to learn. Students should learn trig functions because they are an elegant solution to a complicated problem. They should read Hamlet because it’s a good play. They should learn things because there is value in learning them. Instead, educators have to rend these subjects apart, breaking them into supposedly marketable skills like “reading comprehension” and “analytical reasoning” so that they can be used to demonstrate a student’s market value and justify patently unjust economic outcomes. As long as this is the case, then not only will inequality fail to get better, but education will continue to get worse. Instead of insisting we can educate ourselves out of the social problems capitalism creates, we should learn something new."

We can’t educate our kids out of inequality | The Outline

College Sports River of News - Sun, 11/18/2018 - 01:32
"Those who tout the advantages of a good education like to conjure an image of some future society full of educated professionals all working stable, fulfilling, and salaried jobs. But even the worst students can look around the world and see through this. They can see the economic instability facing most people, and they know that a good education won’t undo the vagaries of the gig economy, or replace the protections of a union. But, they’re told, if you do well enough in school, then hopefully you won’t have to worry about that stuff. This false promise was more disheartening that any other realization I had while working with students. Unfair tests, confusing admissions policies, unequal schools — all that is bad but sadly unsurprising, so you can prepare yourself for it. On the other hand, I was not prepared to lie to students about how, if they just figured out trig functions, then everything would be OK. Education fetishism gives the illusion of fairness to society’s inequalities. Grades and test scores and college rankings mirror the stratification of the economy, and apply a thin veneer of meritocracy to that hierarchy. What students internalize about school is that it is primarily about ranking people. So attempts to improve education are really attempts to make those rankings more accurate, instead of making them less determinative. As long as this is true, then education is not really the solution to society’s problems. Even bold steps to improve schools and bring down college costs will not fix the problem of inequality, since status and sorting are also the results of education in America. None of this is to say that education is bad or that schools should not be improved for their own sake. Learning things, after all, is fun. Education is great when it’s about teaching people stuff they want to know. But because school has to serve this burden of fixing social problems it is not equipped to fix, it cannot simply teach students interesting things they want to learn. Students should learn trig functions because they are an elegant solution to a complicated problem. They should read Hamlet because it’s a good play. They should learn things because there is value in learning them. Instead, educators have to rend these subjects apart, breaking them into supposedly marketable skills like “reading comprehension” and “analytical reasoning” so that they can be used to demonstrate a student’s market value and justify patently unjust economic outcomes. As long as this is the case, then not only will inequality fail to get better, but education will continue to get worse. Instead of insisting we can educate ourselves out of the social problems capitalism creates, we should learn something new."

Dual Language Second Graders at Ward School Showed Their Public Speaking Skills

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 17:24

Dual Language Second Graders at Ward School Showed Their Public Speaking Skills

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- The NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- The Dual Language second graders at Ward School showed their public speaking skills in English and Spanish when they explained to their parents and teachers why Cinco de Mayo is celebrated.

With May 5 falling on a Saturday, they celebrated a day early, on Friday.

They also celebrated by performing the traditional “Jarabe Tapatío," the Mexican national dance. The children dressed in typical Mexican clothing. The two classrooms also enjoyed a feast of Mexican dishes, which their parents had generously contributed. 

New RochelleEducation

BBC newsreader Richard Baker dies aged 93 | UK news | The Guardian

Obituaries River of News - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 17:09
Presenter long associated with Radio 3’s classical music shows was known for his smooth delivery

300 People Attended the New Rochelle Special Education PTA's 21st Annual We Are One Awards

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 16:51

From the Henry Barnard Early Childhood Center: Physical education teacher Marc Cohen (left) and member of the custodial staff Nick Caruso, who is a City School District of New Rochelle graduate

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- More than 300 people attended the New Rochelle Special Education PTA's 21st annual We Are One awards dinner on May 3 at The VIP Country Club. Here are some photos from the evening.

 

Second Annual Take a Student Ambassador to Work Day

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 15:24

Second Annual Take a Student Ambassador to Work Day

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- Forty-six New Rochelle High School students had the opportunity to experience a day in the workplace and to explore careers in My Brother's Keeper New Rochelle's second annual "Take a Student Ambassador to Work Day."

They chose from among 16 businesses in the event, which coincided with Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day on April 26.

Here are some photos from the day:

 

New RochelleEducation

New Rochelle High School Budget

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 12:19

City School District of New Rochelle

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- 

DID YOU KNOW…?

Notes on the adopted $272.8 million 2018-19 budget:

Included in the budget are funds for four additional school counselors, one for each house in New Rochelle High School. Counselors help students with their academic careers, social-emotional development and preparation for college and careers after high school. With the help of the guidance department, members of the class of 2018 have chosen and been accepted to many top colleges, including all eight Ivy League schools.

New RochelleEducation

New Rochelle High School Budget

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 10:56

City School District of New Rochelle

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DID YOU KNOW…?

Notes on the adopted $272.8 million 2018-19 budget:

Included in the budget are funds for four additional school counselors, one for each house in New Rochelle High School. Counselors help students with their academic careers, social-emotional development and preparation for college and careers after high school. With the help of the guidance department, members of the class of 2018 have chosen and been accepted to many top colleges, including all eight Ivy League schools.

New RochelleEducation

Isaac E. Young Middle School Eighth Graders Sailed the Shoreline on the Shamrock IV and Strolled Glen Island Park to Learn Their History

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 10:52

Isaac E. Young Middle School Eighth Graders Sailed the Shoreline on the Shamrock IV and Strolled Glen Island Park to Learn Their History

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- About 120 Isaac E. Young Middle School eighth graders learned about our rich local history (and spotted plenty of jellyfish) when they sailed the shoreline on the Shamrock IV and strolled Glen Island Park to read the plaques with notes about the past.

New Rochelle City Historian Barbara Davis was their guide on the charter boat as they viewed sights such as Hudson Park and 80-acre Davids Island

New RochelleEducation

New Rochelle High School Students Presented “The Immigration History of New Rochelle”

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 10:01

New Rochelle High School Students Present “The Immigration History of New Rochelle”

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- On Thursday, New Rochelle High School seniors Sarah Mendoza and Evan McCullough returned to Isaac E. Young Middle School, from which they both graduated, to present a slideshow called “The Immigration History of New Rochelle” to eighth-graders who are learning about the city's past.

 

New RochelleEducation

Q&A on the 2018-19 Budget

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 09:50

City School District of New Rochelle

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- We've updated the Q&A on the 2018-19 budget adopted by the Board of Education to answer questions that were raised at the May 1 hearing.

You can find the Q&A here

 

New RochelleEducation

New Rochelle High School Freshman raised more than $12,000 for Children's Cancer Research

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 09:39

City School District of New Rochelle

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- Another great story about our students! This time it's two New Rochelle High School freshman who raised more than $12,000 for children's cancer research with a lacrosse tournament.

 

New RochelleEducation

CBS News Spotlights Exemplary Students

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 08:32

City School District of New Rochelle

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NEW ROCHELLE, NY -- Great segment from CBS News spotlighting our exemplary students. What an accomplishment - acceptances from all eight Ivy League schools!

New RochelleEducation

Westchester Residents Invited to Wandering Prevention Program to Help Protect Loved Ones Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

Featured Posts - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 04:17

Westchester Residents Invited to Wandering Prevention Program to Help Protect Loved Ones Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

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NEW YORK, NY -- Westchester Residents Invited to Wandering Prevention Program to Help Protect Loved Ones Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) will be holding a free wandering prevention program to help families learn how to protect and ensure the safety of their loved ones who live with Alzheimer’s  disease and other related dementias, and prevent them from wandering. 

TOTS_WideWestchester County

The FDA shields youths from vaping - CSMonitor.com

Sports River of News - Thu, 11/15/2018 - 20:54
via Christian Science Monitor | All Stories https://www.csmonitor.com/

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